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as well. israel has to know that they can live in peace and security, just as palestinians need to know they can live in a viable state. it is very important to understand both sides of the argument and i don't think that is where very good example of that. >> [inaudible] and the government over the past two years, it has been rejected by the palestinian authority. >> yet it does require bilateral talks. i think that there is, as i was indicating a few minutes ago, faults on both sides when it comes to efforts to have negotiations of the last few years. israel has been wanting to negotiate into negotiations. they have not been the more decisive offer of anything seen in recent years. anything that has been called for. i think both of those things are going to have to change if we are going to see a successful process. >> mr. fitzpatrick? >> the foreign secretary said he's worried he is worried about the backlash from israel and others. given the sentiments, the refugee camps come at the object policy and the rest come how much more can we get that also means? >> well, unfortunately it c
's not forget that history doesn't stop or even slow down in the middle east. elections are coming up. israel, jordan, egypt, iran, and elsewhere, we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which felt on every one of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain, domestic politics in a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there's two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on one hand and the spread of al-qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dog unless we forget within less than a year of taking office, both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush, and the arab spring for president obama, so there's a lot on the agenda. today, we're going to take an early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now, we, at the washin
to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge that we need to face. and the solution is not a military solution. it's a smart one. >> we have to wrap up soon. to get the conference back on schedule. two more comments here and back there to get them in. >> thank you very much. [inaudible] i'm the australia commissioner in australia. i'm afraid on -- [inaudible] i wanted to make a point after having had a long period of being a diplomatic prak practitioner. particularly in my world and to say that the new normal viewed from outside of the world has some good news, which i just would like to throw in. one is that while this is being happening in the rest of the world, china we know what happened in china. but thailand has sufficiently grown to no longer being a recipien
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3